Search

The holiday season is one of the most dangerous times of the year

For household fires that is. And overeating, but I digress. Cooking is the top cause of holiday fires, according to the U.S. Fire Administration. Take note of these tips to reduce your risk.


The U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) reports more than double the number of open-flame fires on Christmas Day than on an average day, and about twice as many on New Year’s Day. And when those fires occur, they do more damage: Property loss during a holiday fire is 34% greater than in an average fire, and the number of fatalities per thousand fires is nearly 70% higher.


Decorative Lights

Attn: All Clark Griswold's - Inspect light strings, and throw out any with frayed or cracked wires or broken sockets. When decorating, don’t run more than three strings of lights end to end. Extension cords should be in good condition and UL-rated for indoor or outdoor use. Check outdoor receptacles to make sure the ground fault interrupters don’t trip.

Cooking

"Ah, Hergy Dergy Bergy;" take it from The Swedish Chef, the most common culprit is food that’s left unattended. It’s easy to get distracted; take a pot holder with you when you leave the kitchen as a reminder that you have something on the stove. Make sure to keep a kitchen fire extinguisher that’s rated for all types of fires, and check that smoke detectors are working. If you’re planning to deep-fry your holiday turkey, do it outside, on a flat, level surface at least 10 feet from the house.

Candles

The incidence of candle fires is four times higher during December than during other months. According to the National Fire Protection Association, four of the five most dangerous days of the year for residential candle fires are Christmas/Christmas Eve and New Year’s/New Year’s Eve.


To reduce the danger, maintain about a foot of space between the candle and anything that can burn. Before bed, walk through each room to make sure candles are blown out. For atmosphere without worry, consider flameless LED candles.



Christmas Trees

It takes less than 30 seconds for a dry tree to engulf a room in flames, according to the Building and Fire Research Laboratory of the National Institute for Standards and Technology. “They make turpentine out of pine trees,” notes Tom Olshanski, spokesman for the USFA. “A Christmas tree is almost explosive when it goes.”

To minimize risk, buy a fresh tree with intact needles, get a fresh cut on the trunk, and water it every day. A well-watered tree is almost impossible to ignite. Oh, and be careful putting that star atop the tree.



Fireplaces

Soot can harden on chimney walls as flammable creosote, so before the fireplace season begins, have your chimney inspected to see if it needs cleaning. Screen the fireplace to prevent embers from popping out onto the floor or carpet, and never use flammable liquids to start a fire in the fireplace. Only burn seasoned wood — no wrapping paper. When cleaning out the fireplace, put embers in a metal container and set them outside to cool for 24 hours before disposal. 



13 views

Our Promise

  • Quality Products

  • Manufacturer Direct Pricing

  • Nationwide Shipping 

  • The Best Service Available

Operating Hours

Mon - Fri: 8 am - 5 pm CST

  • Auto-Out Fire Protection LinkedIn
  • Auto-Out Fire Protection - Facebook

© 2020 by Auto-Out